All the Pickup Truck News: 2020 Honda Ridgeline Revised, Ford Super Duty Recall and More

2020 Honda Ridgeline

Honda won Cars.com’s 2019 Mid-Size Pickup Challenge — an intensive multivehicle comparison test — with its 2019 Ridgeline, and for 2020, the Ridgeline is getting a higher starting price and some key additions. Among the Ridgeline changes is a new standard nine-speed automatic transmission and standard Honda Sensing safety technology. Other updates include standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Related: More Pickup Trucks News

Getting into a new Ridgeline, however, will cost buyers more. Honda is eliminating two trim levels: the mid-level RTL-T trim and entry-level RT trim. Without the RT model, the most affordable Ridgeline for 2020 will now be the Sport model, which will cost $34,995 (including a $1,095 destination charge), a $510 price increase over the 2019 Sport and almost $4,000 more than a 2019 Ridgeline RT’s starting price of $31,085.

Other big pickup truck news this week included a federal safety recall of 2017-19 Ford Super Duty pickups for a defect in the seat belt pretensioner that may cause excessive sparks and ignite a fire in models with carpet flooring. Elsewhere, the famous (infamous?) Tesla Cybertruck is also likely to be certified in the same vehicle class as heavy-duty pickups like the Ford Super Duty F-250, according to the manufacturer.

Take a look at all that and more truck headlines from the past week from both Cars.com and sister site PickupTrucks.com below.

Updated 2020 Honda Ridgeline Gets Standard 9-Speed Automatic, Big Entry Price Bump

2017-2019 Ford Super Duty Fire Hazard: Recall Alert

The Week in Tesla News: Cybertruck Reporting for Medium-Duty, EV Tax Credit Talks, Tesla Truck Gift Ideas and More

10 Biggest Pickup Truck Stories: Toyota Tacoma Plays It Safe Against Silverado Special Edition, Tesla Cybertruck

Top 5 Reviews and Videos of the Week: Jeep Wrangler EcoDiesel, Land Rover Defender Climb

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