View Local Inventory
Save

2010 Toyota Tundra

2010 Toyota Tundra

Change year or vehicle
$9,815 — $27,775 USED
13
Photos
Truck
2-6 Seats
15-17 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 8 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • New 4.6-liter V-8 with broad, flat peak torque curve and good fuel economy
  • 5.7-liter V-8 among best half-ton-pickup engines
  • Available 10,000-pound-plus tow rating for every cab/bed configuration
  • Massive front brakes with excellent stopping power

The Bad

  • Dark, sterile interior materials
  • Unloaded ride quality is harsh
  • Huge CrewMax has no rear captain's chairs in luxury model
  • Long reach for some controls
  • Instrument gauges sit in deep barrels in the instrument panel
2010 Toyota Tundra exterior side view

What to Know

about the 2010 Toyota Tundra
  • 4.6-liter V-8 and six-speed automatic replace 4.7-liter V-8 and five-speed automatic
  • New upscale Platinum Package
  • New entry-level Work Truck Package
  • Front end freshened with new two-bar grille
  • Minor interior revisions

We’re looking for the best deals on a Toyota near you…

Are you looking for more listings?

Change location

Please enter a valid 5-digit ZIP code.

Search Again

— OR —

Sign up for listing notifications

Sign Up

2010 Toyota Tundra Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Toyota has introduced an all-new 4.6-liter V-8 engine and 6-speed transmission combination for the 2010 Tundra. Mark Williams from PickupTrucks.com and David Lee from Toyota take you through the details.

Vehicle Overview
Toyota went for the jugular in the 2007 model year when it introduced the second-generation Tundra. It sported a powerful 5.7-liter V-8 engine and six-speed automatic, and all cab/bed configurations could be equipped to tow at least 10,000 pounds.

Today, the Tundra faces much stiffer competition from Chevrolet, Dodge, GMC and Ford half-ton pickups, all of which have been updated or revised with new powertrains and features in the past year.

The Tundra comes in two- or four-wheel drive, and in three cab styles: regular cab, Double Cab and CrewMax. The CrewMax is the largest cab in the half-ton segment since Chrysler discontinued the Mega Cab option for the Dodge Ram 1500 last year. The CrewMax comes only with a 5-foot, 6-inch bed, while other versions can be ordered with either a 6-foot, 6-inch bed, or an 8-foot cargo bed. Trim levels include Tundra, SR5 and Limited.

New for 2010
Toyota’s new 310-horsepower, 4.6-liter i-Force V-8 makes 327 pounds-feet of torque. It’s smaller than the 276-hp, 4.7-liter V-8 with 313 pounds-feet of torque that it replaces, but it’s also stronger, lighter and more efficient. It’s also about 100 pounds lighter than the 4.7-liter.

Tundra models are split into two classes: Tundra Grade and Limited Grade. Tundra Grade models sport a new two-bar front grille and revised taillamps, while Limited models wear a billet-style grille. A redesigned seven-pin towing hitch connector now sits above the hitch to help avoid...

Vehicle Overview
Toyota went for the jugular in the 2007 model year when it introduced the second-generation Tundra. It sported a powerful 5.7-liter V-8 engine and six-speed automatic, and all cab/bed configurations could be equipped to tow at least 10,000 pounds.

Today, the Tundra faces much stiffer competition from Chevrolet, Dodge, GMC and Ford half-ton pickups, all of which have been updated or revised with new powertrains and features in the past year.

The Tundra comes in two- or four-wheel drive, and in three cab styles: regular cab, Double Cab and CrewMax. The CrewMax is the largest cab in the half-ton segment since Chrysler discontinued the Mega Cab option for the Dodge Ram 1500 last year. The CrewMax comes only with a 5-foot, 6-inch bed, while other versions can be ordered with either a 6-foot, 6-inch bed, or an 8-foot cargo bed. Trim levels include Tundra, SR5 and Limited.

New for 2010
Toyota’s new 310-horsepower, 4.6-liter i-Force V-8 makes 327 pounds-feet of torque. It’s smaller than the 276-hp, 4.7-liter V-8 with 313 pounds-feet of torque that it replaces, but it’s also stronger, lighter and more efficient. It’s also about 100 pounds lighter than the 4.7-liter.

Tundra models are split into two classes: Tundra Grade and Limited Grade. Tundra Grade models sport a new two-bar front grille and revised taillamps, while Limited models wear a billet-style grille. A redesigned seven-pin towing hitch connector now sits above the hitch to help avoid damage and dirt. Also, a shelf to help organize storage space has been added to the lower glove box.

The new Tundra Grade Work Truck Package is aimed at commercial buyers. It’s an entry-level model available in only regular or Double Cab configurations, with vinyl seating and rubber floors. It’s priced up to $1,030 less than the truck’s standard MSRP. At the high end of the spectrum is the new Platinum Package option for Limited Tundras equipped with the 5.7-liter V-8. It includes heated and ventilated seats, a sunroof and wood-grain trim.

Exterior
Toyota made sure this Tundra wouldn’t have sand kicked in its face by designing a big, brawny pickup that looks like it could bully any truck on the market — at least from the front. The massive grille, sculptured hood and husky bumper present an intimidating head-on view. From the side, the Tundra is rather conventional. A deck-rail adjustable tie-down system is available for all cargo beds.

Interior
The Tundra’s interior is designed to accommodate working people. The control knobs are easy to grip, even in work gloves, and the gauges are easy to read at a glance but placed at the end of long barrels in the dash. There are plenty of storage options, especially with a center console that can hold a laptop and hanging files. Even the regular cab Tundra has enough room behind the seats to hold five-gallon paint buckets. The seats are wide, supportive and comfortable. The new Platinum Package adds luxury touches that until now were only available in trucks like high-end Ford F-150s.

Under the Hood

  • 236-hp, 4.0-liter V-6 with aluminum block and cylinder heads, dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, with 266 pounds-feet of torque
  • 310-hp, 4.6-liter V-8 with aluminum block and two-alloy cylinder heads, dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, with 327 pounds-feet of torque
  • 381-hp, 5.7-liter V-8 with aluminum block and cylinder heads, dual overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, with 401 pounds-feet of torque
  • Five-speed automatic transmission (standard with V-6)
  • Six-speed automatic (standard with 4.6-liter V-8 or 5.7-liter V-8)

Safety
Toyota emphasizes safety with a suite of electronic braking technologies that help drivers avoid accidents. All are tied into the antilock braking system. They include traction control, brake assist and electronic stability control. Toyota also has electronic brake-force distribution, which adjusts braking pressure according to cargo load. The Tundra doesn’t hold back on airbags, with side-impact airbags in front and side curtain airbags standard on all versions.

  • Front and rear sonar parking aids
  • Available backup camera
  • Three-point seat belts at all positions

Of Interest to Truck Owners

  • Maximum gross vehicle weight rating: 7,000-7,200 pounds (CrewMax 4×4)
  • Maximum payload capacity: 2,000 pounds (regular cab 4×2)
  • Maximum towing capacity: 10,800 pounds (regular cab 4×2)
  • Fuel capacity: 26.4 gallons
  • Axle ratio: 3.90:1, 4.10:1, 4.30:1
  • Transfer case low range: 2.618:1
  • Crawl ratio: 37.52:1 (6A w/4.30:1 axle)
  • Minimum ground clearance: 10-10.2 inches (4×2); 10.4-10.6 inches (4×4)
  • Approach angle: 27-29 degrees
  • Departure angle: 24-27 degrees
  • Cargo floor length: 66.7 inches (CrewMax), 78.7 inches (standard bed), 97.6 inches (long bed)
  • Cargo floor width: 66.4 inches
  • Cargo floor width at wheel well: 50 inches
  • Cargo bed depth: 22.2 inches

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.6
87 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.6)
Performance
(4.6)
Interior Design
(4.3)
Comfort
(4.5)
Reliability
(4.6)
Value For The Money
(4.4)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Great Truck and love the crewmax cab

by Leon from Iowa on December 9, 2020

Bought this truck to fit 6 people. my model as the front bench seat and 4x4 this is has been a great truck. 5.7 v8 had a lot of power and pulls everything I need it too. Read full review

(5.0)

Toyota makes the most reliable car.

by Smashtin from Petaluma, Ca on June 17, 2020

I’ve owned several types of light trucks. The Tundra has been by far the better choice on many levels. I am very pleased with this truck. Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2010 Toyota Tundra currently has 14 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2010 Toyota Tundra has not been tested.

Latest 2010 Tundra Stories

Change Year or Vehicle

0 Photos
0 / 0

Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Tundra received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

What's your location?

To find the best deals near you, please enter your ZIP code.